Arkansas Fried Green Tomatoes

Arkansas Fried Green Tomatoes

Ready in 45 minutes

In the early 1800s, tomato fritters, sliced tomatoes rolled in flour and cornmeal, were popular. They evolved into this tasty Southern delicacy, using firmer green tomatoes which are just regular tomatoes picked before they turn red, and which have a more piquant flavor than their ripened brethren... This is another of our family favorites, originating from my maternal (Southern) grandmother.

"Most excellent recipe. First freeze of the year coming up tonight and I had about 20 green tomatoes that I had to pick. The family ate them faster than I could cook them. We will definitely use this recipe again."

- KirkH

Top-ranked recipe named "Arkansas Fried Green Tomatoes"

4.3 avg, 8 review(s) 75% would make again

Ingredients

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4 medium very green tomatoes; with skin (up to 6)
2 large Eggs; lightly beaten
3/4 cup All purpose flour
3/4 cup white cornmeal; finely ground (preferably stone ground)
1 cup peanut oil; or a mixture of oil and bacon dripping
salt; to taste
freshly ground black pepper; to taste

Original recipe makes 4

Servings  

Preparation

Remove the stems of the tomatoes then using a serrated knife, slice crosswise into slices about 1/4-inch inch thick. Break the eggs into a shallow bowl and season with salt and pepper. Set aside. Combine the cornmeal and flour in a second shallow bowl and season with salt and pepper.

Season sliced tomatoes a few at a time with salt and pepper.

Heat the oil in a skillet over medium heat. When it is hot but not smoking, dip the slices of tomato one at a time in the beaten eggs, letting the excess drain back into the bowl, roll them quickly in the breading, gently shake off the excess, slip them into the hot pan.

Fry the tomato slices until they are golden on the bottom, about 2 to 3 minutes, then gently turn them with a spatula and continue cooking until both sides are golden. Drain them briefly on paper towels and eat at once!

Makes 4 to 6 servings.

Notes

Green tomatoes should neither be too hard, like an apple, nor too soft, like a ripe tomato. They should be green all the way through, though a tinge of pink on the inside is OK. They should stand up well either to deep frying or pan sauteing. Slices should be neither too thick nor too thin; 1/4-to-3/8-inch slices are good. These will soften during the cooking process, so if they're not ripe to begin with, you'll have mush when you're done. Use a metal spatula for turning the tomatoes, scraping the surface of the pan when you lift them. This ensures that you won't accidentally separate the cornmeal coating from the tomato.

I'll repeat this great Southern tip in many deep-fried recipes...adding a small amount of bacon drippings to the oil, gives the dish a slightly smoky flavor, making a great product even better!

Fried green tomatoes are best when served hot--straight out of the skillet, but use caution as the insides of the tomatoes retain a lot of heat and could burn your mouth.

The way my dad ate these, we were lucky to get any ripe tomatoes from the garden! One of his best ideas was to use fried green tomatoes on his BLT sandwich...talk about yuuumy!

My sister likes them with melted cheese. Preheat the broiler. Place the fried tomatoes in a baking dish and sprinkle with 1/2 cup grated sharp cheddar. Broil just long enough to melt the cheese, and serve right away.

Credits

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Verified by stevemur
Calories Per Serving: 925 Get detailed nutrition information, including line-by-line nutrition insights?  Try BigOven Pro for Free for 14 days!

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Most excellent recipe. First freeze of the year coming up tonight and I had about 20 green tomatoes that I had to pick. The family ate them faster than I could cook them. We will definitely use this recipe again.
KirkH 2 years ago
Great recipe!! They were delicious! Will def make again!!
HarlemTScuba 3 years ago
I make an Italian version like my nana used to make ( immigrant from Italy to NJ). I updated using Panko bread crumbs - her recipe was regular breadcrumbs with dried oregano, a bit of flour and freshly grated reggiano parmasan cheese. Slice firm green tomatoes, dip in egg then bread crumb flour cheese coating and fry in EVOO with finely chopped garlic. Salt as they drain on paper towels. The panko gives a nicer crust but the recipe takes me back 40 years to my nana's kitchen and Pop's tomato garden
Sweeney52 3 years ago
These tomatoes were just like my grandma used to make and she happened to be from Arkansas. They were perfect.
rltalbott 4 years ago
This southern staple is absolutely delicious--the perfect comfort food for me! Some recipes use plain cornmeal, some use plain flour. I like the mixture of both. The flour helps the coating to stick, while the cornmeal adds more flavor and crunch! If you like a thicker coating you can double coat them...after dipping the tomato slices in the eggs and rolling in the breading, re-dip the coated tomato slices in the eggs, letting the excess drain off, then rolling once again in the breading. One secret is not to fry the slices too long. Overcooking results in a mushy, soggy interior. Have the oil HOT and only cook until lightly golden and crisp, about 2 minutes on each side. If you'd like, fry these in bacon grease, or a mixture of oil and bacon grease. Using bacon grease makes a big difference in flavor. For a little zip, I sometimes add about 1/2 teaspoon cayenne to the flour/cornmeal mixture and/or a few good dashes of hot pepper sauce to the beaten eggs. These are delicious hot off the stove, used as a side dish, and great served with Buttermilk Ranch dressing, a spicy Southwestern dressing, or my favorite...Chipotle Mayonnaise.
sgrishka 6 years ago
Everyone has different taste, expectations and opinions...and, I respect anyone's right to express their opinion. But, to give a recipe a poor rating of '1 star' and to check 'No, I would never make this recipe again.' without also posting a reason for that rating...that's simply wrong! When rating a recipe, either good or bad, you should indicate what you liked or disliked, what you felt was right or wrong with the recipe, or if perhaps you simply didn't like the dish in general. I (and I'm sure others) don't mind constructive criticisms. That's how we grow and improve ourselves...we just need to know what is wrong to do so! [I made edits to this recipe.]
sgrishka 6 years ago
Green tomatoes should neither be too hard, like an apple, nor too soft, like a ripe tomato. They should be green all the way through, though a tinge of pink on the inside is OK. They should stand up well either to deep frying or pan sauteing. Slices should be neither too thick nor too thin; 1/4-to-3/8-inch slices are good. These will soften during the cooking process, so if they're not ripe to begin with, you'll have mush when you're done. Use a metal spatula for turning the tomatoes, scraping the surface of the pan when you lift them. This ensures that you won't accidentally separate the cornmeal coating from the tomato. I'll repeat this great Southern tip in many deep-fried recipes...adding a small amount of bacon drippings to the oil, gives the dish a slightly smoky flavor, making a great product even better!Fried green tomatoes are best when served hot--straight out of the skillet, but use caution as the insides of the tomatoes retain a lot of heat and could burn your mouth.The way my dad ate these, we were lucky to get any ripe tomatoes from the garden! One of his best ideas was to use fried green tomatoes on his BLT sandwich...talk about yuuumy!My sister likes them with melted cheese. Preheat the broiler. Place the fried tomatoes in a baking dish and sprinkle with 1/2 cup grated sharp cheddar. Broil just long enough to melt the cheese, and serve right away.
bettyann9 6 years ago
Green tomatoes should neither be too hard, like an apple, nor too soft, like a ripe tomato. They should be green all the way through, though a tinge of pink on the inside is OK. They should stand up well either to deep frying or pan sauteing. Slices should be neither too thick nor too thin; 1/4-to-3/8-inch slices are good. These will soften during the cooking process, so if they're not ripe to begin with, you'll have mush when you're done. Use a metal spatula for turning the tomatoes, scraping the surface of the pan when you lift them. This ensures that you won't accidentally separate the cornmeal coating from the tomato. I'll repeat this great Southern tip in many deep-fried recipes...adding a small amount of bacon drippings to the oil, gives the dish a slightly smoky flavor, making a great product even better! Fried green tomatoes are best when served hot--straight out of the skillet, but use caution as the insides of the tomatoes retain a lot of heat and could burn your mouth. The way my dad ate these, we were lucky to get any ripe tomatoes from the garden! One of his best ideas was to use fried green tomatoes on his BLT sandwich...talk about yuuumy! My sister likes them with melted cheese. Preheat the broiler. Place the fried tomatoes in a baking dish and sprinkle with 1/2 cup grated sharp cheddar. Broil just long enough to melt the cheese, and serve right away. [I posted this recipe.]
sgrishka 6 years ago
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