Oysters Rockefeller

Ready in 45 minutes
2 review(s) averaging 2.5. 50% would make again

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Try this Oysters Rockefeller recipe, or contribute your own. "Appetizers" and "Hors dOeuvres" are two tags used to describe Oysters Rockefeller.


Ingredients

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10 Fresh oysters*
Rock salt; , for steadying the oysters
2 tablespoons Butter
3 Spring onions; , finely chopped (alternatively use shallot onions)
1 clove Garlic; , minced
2 dl Spinach; , fresh or frozen, chopped
1/2 dl Bread crumbs
12 drops Worcestershire sauce (lea & perrins); , to taste
8 drops Tabasco sauce; , to taste
Salt and pepper; , to taste
100 grams Parmesan cheese; grated
3 tablespoons Parsley; , chopped
1 Lemon; wedges for garnish

Original recipe makes 2

Servings  

Preparation

.

PREPARING THE SPINACH MIXTURE

1. In a saucepan, melt the butter and sweat down the spring onion. Add the minced garlic and sweat for an additional minute or two at very low heat as to not to burn the garlic.

2. Add the spinach to the pan and cook at low heat, stirring constantly. Mix in the bread crumbs.

3. Finally add Worcestershire sauce, Tabasco sauce and salt to taste. The mixture should taste quite acidic with a slight ?hot sting? from the Tabasco sauce. If needed, add a little more butter lo loosen up the mixture and make it more moist. (NOTE: The spinach mixture may be made ahead of time and refrigerated until ready to use.)

PREPARING AND BROILING THE OYSTERS

1. Preheat oven broiler (maximum grill incl. hot air circulation)

2. Line an ovenproof trey with a layer of rock salt.

3. Using an oyster knife, pry open the oyster shells and discard the top shells.

4. Then arrange the oysters in the rock salt to steady them, making sure they are level.

5. Spoon an equal amount of the prepared spinach mixture over each oyster and spread to the rim of the shell.

6. Add the grated parmesan cheese on top of each oyster.

7. Broil the oysters approximately 5 minutes on lower shelf and 2 min on top shelf (with the hot air circulation on). Look for the edges of the oysters to curl and the topping bubbling from light brown to a darker brown color. (NOTE: Watch carefully at the final broiling phase).

8. Remove from the oven and garnish the oysters with parsley sprigs on top and lemon wedges on the side.

9. Serve immediately.

Notes

* Use 4-5 small oysters per person for a starter. It is best to use small oyster for this recipe; the oysters themselves (not the shells) should be no more than 1 to 1 1/2 inches in diameter. Any variety of oysters will work; just make sure the oysters you choose are as fresh as possible, still alive, and tightly closed.

Many traditional versions are made with 1/2 teaspoon of Pernod or Herbsaint.

Oysters Rockefeller is a famous oyster dish served at many restaurants throughout the United States. The dish consists of oysters on the half-shell that have been topped with various other ingredients (often spinach or parsley, cheese, a rich butter sauce and bread crumbs) and are then baked or broiled. Oysters Rockefeller was created at the New Orleans restaurant Antoine's. Antoine's was founded in 1840 by Antoine Alciatore, who moved to New Orleans after two frustrating years in New York to open a restaurant of his own. The dish was named Oysters Rockefeller after John D. Rockefeller, the richest American at the time. Jules Alciatore, Antoine's son, developed Oysters Rockefeller based on another of his recipes in the face of a shortage of French snails and diners' declining taste for them, substituting oysters for snails. Antoine's has been serving the original recipe dish since 1899.

Though many New Orleans restaurants serve dishes purporting to be Oysters Rockefeller, Antoine's claims that no other restaurant has been able to successfully duplicate the recipe. Knock-off versions of the dish have proliferated in New Orleans, developed to capitalize on the fame of Antoine's signature dish, but because the recipe for Oysters Rockefeller was passed down from the creator, Jules Alciatore of Antoine's to his children, and has apparently never left the family's hands, competing restaurants have had to formulate their own recipes. (Alton Brown of The Food Network series Good Eats states in the episode titled "Shell Game" that Jules Alciatore took the original recipe with him to the grave, and any version of the recipe that exists today is only an assumption, based on descriptions of the original dish.) While many have achieved the trademark green color of the original ? a color easily attainable by using spinach in the recipe ? it is said that few get the flavor of Antoine's recipe right; furthermore, Antoine's chefs have repeatedly denied that the authentic recipe contains spinach. A 1986 laboratory analysis by William Poundstone in Bigger Secrets indicated that the primary ingredients were parsley, olive oil, and capers.

Malcolm Hebert, native Louisianan, cookbook author and wine and food editor, also indicates that the original recipe did not have spinach and he gives a slightly different version and adds the all-important ingredient Herbsaint (or substitute Pernod).[citation needed] However, it is not possible that either Pernod or Herbsaint were in the original 1899 recipe, as Pernod was first made in 1920 and Herbsaint in 1935. Both spirits were devloped as substitutes for absinthe, which was illegal in the United States from 1915 to 2007.

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I have an issue with anyone posting a history of a recipe by cutting and pasting from wikipedia without footnotes. For the record I have eaten the Oysters Rockefeller at Antoine's and parmesan cheese and spinach are not used.
ChefinTO 3 years ago
* Use 4-5 small oysters per person for a starter. It is best to use small oyster for this recipe; the oysters themselves (not the shells) should be no more than 1 to 1 1/2 inches in diameter. Any variety of oysters will work; just make sure the oysters you choose are as fresh as possible, still alive, and tightly closed. Many traditional versions are made with 1/2 teaspoon of Pernod or Herbsaint. Oysters Rockefeller is a famous oyster dish served at many restaurants throughout the United States. The dish consists of oysters on the half-shell that have been topped with various other ingredients (often spinach or parsley, cheese, a rich butter sauce and bread crumbs) and are then baked or broiled. Oysters Rockefeller was created at the New Orleans restaurant Antoine's. Antoine's was founded in 1840 by Antoine Alciatore, who moved to New Orleans after two frustrating years in New York to open a restaurant of his own. The dish was named Oysters Rockefeller after John D. Rockefeller, the richest American at the time. Jules Alciatore, Antoine's son, developed Oysters Rockefeller based on another of his recipes in the face of a shortage of French snails and diners' declining taste for them, substituting oysters for snails. Antoine's has been serving the original recipe dish since 1899. Though many New Orleans restaurants serve dishes purporting to be Oysters Rockefeller, Antoine's claims that no other restaurant has been able to successfully duplicate the recipe. Knock-off versions of the dish have proliferated in New Orleans, developed to capitalize on the fame of Antoine's signature dish, but because the recipe for Oysters Rockefeller was passed down from the creator, Jules Alciatore of Antoine's to his children, and has apparently never left the family's hands, competing restaurants have had to formulate their own recipes. (Alton Brown of The Food Network series Good Eats states in the episode titled 'Shell Game' that Jules Alciatore took the original recipe with him to the grave, and any version of the recipe that exists today is only an assumption, based on descriptions of the original dish.) While many have achieved the trademark green color of the original ? a color easily attainable by using spinach in the recipe ? it is said that few get the flavor of Antoine's recipe right; furthermore, Antoine's chefs have repeatedly denied that the authentic recipe contains spinach. A 1986 laboratory analysis by William Poundstone in Bigger Secrets indicated that the primary ingredients were parsley, olive oil, and capers. Malcolm Hebert, native Louisianan, cookbook author and wine and food editor, also indicates that the original recipe did not have spinach and he gives a slightly different version and adds the all-important ingredient Herbsaint (or substitute Pernod).[citation needed] However, it is not possible that either Pernod or Herbsaint were in the original 1899 recipe, as Pernod was first made in 1920 and Herbsaint in 1935. Both spirits were devloped as substitutes for absinthe, which was illegal in the United States from 1915 to 2007. [I posted this recipe.]
c.duus 5 years ago
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