Salt and Pepper Spare Ribs

Ready in 30 minutes
2 review(s) averaging 5. 100% would make again

Top-ranked recipe named "Salt and Pepper Spare Ribs"

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One of our favourite take-away dishes but this recipe is the one I learnt from Ken Hom and the one that we always used for the Chinese themed dinner parties for Lord and Lady Hanson.

"These are fabulous I marinated mine overnight, and made the next day, just like the real thing."

- patgarnett

Ingredients

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1 pound Pork Spare Ribs; or Baby back ribs
1 teaspoon Sea Salt; use the coarsest you can find
1/2 teaspoon Cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon Szechwan Peppercorns; see note
1 pinch Five Spice Powder
1 tablespoon Corn Flour; a heaped tablespoon
1 tablespoon Water
1 liter -- 1 litre Vegetable Oil for Frying --
1 Red Chili; finely sliced
1 Spring Onions; finely sliced

Original recipe makes 6

Servings  

Preparation

To make the salt and pepper gently heat the Szechwan peppercorns in a dry pan for 1 minute, cool and grind in a pestle and mortar or a pepper grinder, mix the salt, black pepper and Szechwan peppercorns together set to one side.

Place the spareribs, water, corn flour and five spice powder into a large bowl mix well, cover with cling film and marinade for at least 3 hours in the refrigerator.

Now we cook the spareribs, heat the vegetable oil in a wok or deep frying pan (a good test is to drop a cube of bread into the hot oil and it should brown in 30 seconds) add the spare ribs and cook for 1 minute, remove the ribs, drain well and set aside.

Now heat the oil again until it is almost smoking return the spareribs to the hot oil and cook until they start to turn brown drain on kitchen paper.

Remove all the oil from the wok and quickly stir-fry the sliced chilli and spring onion add the cooked spareribs to the wok sprinkle the salt and pepper mixture over the ribs, quickly mix all the components together and remove immediately from the heat.

Serve with a finger bowl of warm water and a lemon slice.

Notes

The spareribs available from nearly all supermarkets usually come in two sizes, the short cut ribs are perfect for this recipe but if these are not to be had, carefully chop the larger ribs into smaller pieces), if you can get baby back ribs then do so as they are delicious

Do not cut down the marinating process, as it is an important part in flavouring and an important factor towards tenderising the spareribs

Sichuan pepper (or Szechwan pepper) is the outer pod of the tiny fruit of a number of species in the genus Zanthoxylum, widely grown and consumed in Asia as a spice. Despite the name, it is not related to black pepper or to chilli peppers. It is widely used in the cuisine of Sichuan, China, from which it takes its name, as well as Tibetan, Bhutanese, Nepalese, Japanese and Konkani and Batak Toba cuisines, among others.

It is known in Chinese as huajiao, literally "flower pepper"). In America, it is sold as fagara or flower pepper as well as Sichuan pepper.

Credits

Added on Award Medal
Calories Per Serving: 226 Get detailed nutrition information, including line-by-line nutrition insights?  Try BigOven Pro for Free for 14 days!

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These are fabulous I marinated mine overnight, and made the next day, just like the real thing.
patgarnett 1 month ago
The spareribs available from nearly all supermarkets usually come in two sizes, the short cut ribs are perfect for this recipe but if these are not to be had, carefully chop the larger ribs into smaller pieces), if you can get baby back ribs then do so as they are delicious Do not cut down the marinating process, as it is an important part in flavouring and an important factor towards tenderising the spareribs Sichuan pepper (or Szechwan pepper) is the outer pod of the tiny fruit of a number of species in the genus Zanthoxylum, widely grown and consumed in Asia as a spice. Despite the name, it is not related to black pepper or to chilli peppers. It is widely used in the cuisine of Sichuan, China, from which it takes its name, as well as Tibetan, Bhutanese, Nepalese, Japanese and Konkani and Batak Toba cuisines, among others. It is known in Chinese as huajiao, literally 'flower pepper'). In America, it is sold as fagara or flower pepper as well as Sichuan pepper. [I posted this recipe.]
Astro-Chef 4 years ago
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