German Apple Pancake

German Apple Pancake

Ready in 45 minutes

The German apple pancake is actually a cross between a pancake and a popover. This recipe produces a pancake that has crisp light edges, a custard-like center, and buttery sauteed apples baked into the batter.

"It's really good, but for some reason mine fell apart. I also used different apples and they got mushy. But my failure is probably from not following the directions 100%... I want to try this again and get it perfect, but it did taste very good even with mistakes."

- TokiWartooth

Top-ranked recipe named "German Apple Pancake"

4 avg, 10 review(s) 100% would make again

Ingredients

Are you making this? 
1/2 cup Unbleached all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon Sugar
1/2 teaspoon Salt
2 large Eggs
2/3 cup Half-and-half
1 teaspoon Vanilla extract
2 tablespoons Unsalted butter
1 1/4 pounds Granny Smith or Braeburn apples; (3 to 4 large apples), peeled, cored, cut into 1/2-inch thick slices
1/4 cup brown sugar; light or dark, both work equally well
1/4 teaspoon Ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon lemon juice; freshly squeezed
confectioners' sugar; for dusting
-- Caramel Sauce (Optional) --
1/2 cup Water
1 cup Sugar
1 cup Heavy cream
1/8 teaspoon Salt
1/2 teaspoon Vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon lemon juice; freshly squeezed

Original recipe makes 4

Servings  

Preparation

Position oven rack to upper-middle position and heat oven to 500 degrees F.

In a mediium bowl combine the flour, sugar and salt, mixing well. In a second medium bowl, whisk together eggs, half-and-half and vanilla. Add liquid ingredients to dry and whisk until no lumps remain, then set batter aside until needed.

Heat butter in a 10-inch ovenproof nonstick skillet (or a well seasoned 10-inch cast-iron skillet*) over medium-high heat until butter is sizzling hot. Add apples, brown sugar, and cinnamon; cook, stirring frequently, until apples are golden brown, about 10 minutes. Turn off heat and stir in lemon juice. Working quickly, pour batter evenly over apples. Place skillet in the upper-middle position of oven preheated to 500 degrees F. Immediately lower temperature to 425 degrees F. and bake until the pancake edges are browned and puffy, and have risen above edges of skillet, about 18-20 minutes.

Remove skillet from oven, loosen pancake edges with a spatula and invert pancake onto a serving platter. Dust pancake with confectioners sugar and cut into wedges to serve. If desired, the pancake can be served with warm caramel sauce, or warm melted apple jelly, or warn apple butter, or warn maple syrup, and/or a big dollop of whipped cream.

*Note: If using a cast-iron skillet, preheat oven to 425 degrees F. and when cooking the apples, cook them only until just barely golden, about 6 minutes. Cast iron retains heat better than stainless steel, making the higher oven temperature unnecessary.

To make Caramel Sauce: Place water in heavy-bottomed 2-quart saucepan. Carefully add sugar to center of pan, making sure not to let sugar crystals adhere to sides of pan. Cover and bring mixture to boil over high heat. Once boiling, uncover and continue to boil until syrup is thick and straw-colored (300 degrees F.), about 7 minutes. Reduce heat to medium and continue to cook until syrup is deep amber (350 degrees F.), about 1 to 2 minutes.

Meanwhile, bring cream and salt to simmer in small saucepan over high heat (if cream boils before sugar reaches deep amber color, remove cream from heat and cover to keep warm).

Remove sugar syrup from heat and very carefully pour about one quarter of hot cream into syrup (mixture will bubble vigorously), and let bubbling subside. Add remaining cream, vanilla, and lemon juice, whisking until smooth. Makes about 1 1/2 cups.

Sauce can be cooled and refrigerated in airtight container for up to 2 weeks. If you make the caramel sauce ahead, reheat it in the microwave or a small saucepan over low heat until warm and fluid.

Notes

Using half-and-half will give the pancake a rich flavor without sacrificing texture.

If you like tart apples, use Granny Smiths; if you like sweet apples, use Braeburns, or try a combination of both. Cutting the apples into at least 1/2-inch thick pieces keeps them from turning mushy when cooked.

Preheating the oven to 500 degrees gives the batter the initial high heat it needs for a quick rise...lowering the temperature to 425 degrees provides the moderate heat that cooks the pancake to perfection.

Credits

Added on Award Medal
Calories Per Serving: 1799 Get detailed nutrition information, including line-by-line nutrition insights?  Try BigOven Pro for Free for 14 days!

Date My private notes
Add your own private notes with BigOven Pro!

Recipe Links

Link in another recipe. What would you serve with this?

Reviews for German Apple Pancake

I'd rate it:


sign in to add your comment

Tags


Reviews

Add yours!

It's really good, but for some reason mine fell apart. I also used different apples and they got mushy. But my failure is probably from not following the directions 100%... I want to try this again and get it perfect, but it did taste very good even with mistakes.
TokiWartooth 2 years ago
These are by far the best german pancakes! I forgot the lemons but didn't miss it. Also, drizzled it with my leftover buttermilk syrup (from allrecipes).
moaa 3 years ago
This isn't adapted - you have to actually change something to adapt it. And sgrishka, you should learn the difference between plagiarism and copyright infringement. They're not the same thing. While you may or may not have infringed on Cook's Illustrated's copyright, you most certainly have plagiarized them - you took credit for their work.
3 years ago
Hello! I would love to make this recipe for Easter brunch. I do have a cast iron skillet but, considering I am having 20+ people for brunch was wondering what you might suggest for preparing this in a larger quantity? Do you think a pre-heated glass baking dish would suffice? Or, am I better off, borrowing another cast iron skillet and making two? Your advice is appreciated!
jendbecker 4 years ago
BiancaMC - Once again, this recipe is adapted from a Cook's Illustrated recipe...and, when originally posted, that source information was also posted in the 'source' field. Since you seem to have such a big problem with this issue, why don't you open a problem ticket in the 'Help, Problems and Fixes' forum? Also, when you accuse someone of plagiarism, you should at least spell plagiarism correctly! For your information: 'Mere listings of ingredients as in recipes, formulas, compounds, or prescriptions are not subject to copyright protection. However, when a recipe or formula is accompanied by substantial literary expression in the form of an explanation or directions, or when there is a combination of recipes, as in a cookbook, there may be a basis for copyright protection.' This is copied from the website of the US Copyright office. The first sentence is very specific, saying that a list of ingredients is 'not subject to copyright protection.' Nevertheless, the second sentence does include the modifier 'may', leaving the question open to debate and creating a lot of confusion in cyberspace about where to draw the line. As a home cook, when I post a favorite recipe that I've gleaned from another source, I am obligated to attribute credit to the source using the phrases 'adapted from,' 'based on' or 'inspired by,' depending on how much I've revised the recipe. I will make some degree of change to the wording of the instructions; sometimes more, sometimes less, just not copying entirely word-for-word. As for ingredients, I may or may not use the exact ingredients. Sometimes something may have been added, or removed, or maybe some of the ingredient amounts could have been changed. Other times, especially if I like the recipe results, the ingredients will not be changed, nor am I obligated to change them!
sgrishka 4 years ago
But, this recipe isn't even adapted, so it's a complete plagerism. Unless you consider taking the word 'sea' from sea salt, then you adapted it. Even if a source feature isn't available you should still be true to yourself, and your followers and give true credit to the team at Cooks Illustrated in the words of the method.
BiancaMC 4 years ago
This recipe is adapted from a Cook's Illustrated recipe. I use many recipes from many sources but I always adapt a recipe to some degree as well as give source credit for any recipe that is not one of mine or my families. When I originally posted this recipe the source information was also posted in the 'source' field. However, the source field in BigOven stopped functioning several years ago. Whenever a new recipe, or a revision to a recipe, are posted in BigOven, the program either removes or does not retain the source data. I opened a problem ticket for this issue back in September of 2007 and again in January of 2008. BigOven added this issue to a list of features to be worked on for a free maintenance release for sometime in February of 2008. Unfortunately, the source field was not repaired and still does not function. I hope this resolves any confusion.
sgrishka 4 years ago
This recipe is copied exactly from Cooks Illustrated. No wonder it works well and everyone likes it. You should at least put a reference to Cooks Illustrated in your recipe.
BiancaMC 4 years ago
[I made edits to this recipe.]
sgrishka 6 years ago
Using half-and-half will give the pancake a rich flavor without sacrificing texture. If you like tart apples, use Granny Smiths; if you like sweet apples, use Braeburns, or try a combination of both. Cutting the apples into at least 1/2-inch thick pieces keeps them from turning mushy when cooked. Preheating the oven to 500 degrees gives the batter the initial high heat it needs for a quick rise...lowering the temperature to 425 degrees provides the moderate heat that cooks the pancake to perfection. [I posted this recipe.]
sgrishka 6 years ago
Add unlimited recipes. Organize in custom folders. Find recipes for your diet. Try BigOven Pro Free