Kc-Style Baby Back Ribs

Kc-Style Baby Back Ribs

Ready in 1 hour
3 avg, 2 review(s) 50% would make again

Top-ranked recipe named "Kc-Style Baby Back Ribs"

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Ingredients

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1/4 c Garlic salt
1/4 c Onion salt
3 tb Chili powder
1/2 c Paprika
1 c Granulated sugar
1/4 c Celery salt
1 ts Dried Mustard Powder
1/2 ts Cayenne pepper
1/2 ts Dried thyme
2 tb Black Pepper; freshly ground
1 tb Lemon Pepper
2 tb Dried Sage
4 slabs Baby Back Ribs; Skinned

Original recipe makes 8

Servings  

Preparation

Hello, Barbecue Enthusiasts! We could not offer you our collection of recipes honoring National Barbecue Month without providing you with the classic of all barbecued ribs. Break out the paper towels and rib bibs ?? were making Kansas City-Style Baby Back Ribs tonight! Otherwise known as loin ribs, baby back pork ribs are more expensive than other styles of pork or beef ribs. However, the price is well worth the money; and dont hesitate to work with the butcher at your local market to get the perfect size or shape of ribs to fit your grill. Prepare the dry rub by sifting together the sugar, seasoned salt, garlic, celery, and onion salts, paprika, chili powder, black, cayenne, and lemon peppers, sage, mustard, and thyme in a large glass mixing bowl. Store in an airtight container, preferably a glass jar, and utilize as a dry rub for todays recipe and other barbecued meals, too. Kitchen Staff Tip: Remember, the "dry rub" mixture is not actually rubbed into the meat. You simply sprinkle it on the cut of meat youll be preparing on the grill or in your smoker. Prepare your grill to maintain a temperature of 230 F to 250 F degrees while cooking the ribs. You may elect to utilize oak, hickory, or apple-flavored wood chips. If you do, remember to soak the bag of wood chips in a bucket of water next to your grill and add them as you grill the baby back ribs. This water-soaked method helps release the full essence of the smoky flavor from the wood chips in the steam and smoke created on your grill. Blot ribs with a paper towel to remove excess moisture, then sprinkle both sides of the ribs with the dry rub. Arrange slabs on the grill and prepare to cook the ribs for 4 to 6 hours, adding more coals as necessary to maintain the heat. Halfway through cooking, turn the ribs. The ribs are done when you can gently pull them apart with safely gloved hands. Transfer ribs to the cutting board and allow them to cool slightly before cutting and serving. Serve with your favorite warmed barbecue sauce on the side, or return the cut ribs to the grill and bathe them in your favorite barbecue sauce as you grill for about 10 minutes more, being sure to turn them once, then serve. Kitchen Staff Tips: You can reduce your grilling time by precooking or parboiling the baby back ribs. Either parboil them in a large stock pot until they are gray, or bake in a moderate 350-F degree oven until lightly browned. Apply dry rub as directed. You may also want to mix up and keep ready keep a light basting liquid of 1 cup water, 1/2 cup olive oil, and 3 tablespoons dry rub, just in case the ribs start drying out on the grill. Total cooking time will be about 1 or 2 hours, depending on the thickness of the ribs. Spareribs are a little less pricey and may also be used with todays recipe. Because they come from the underbelly of the pig, situated right next to the bacon, they dont contain as much meat as baby back ribs. Spareribs are also full of fat and small gristle bones, which end up making the meat juicier on the grill. You may substitute 2 slabs of skinned spareribs for each 3 to 4-lb. portion of baby back ribs, and prepare todays recipe as directed. Grilling time varies if you elect not to parboil or precook the spareribs. Total grilling time runs about 6 to 8 hours. Posted to dailyrecipe@recipe-a-day.com by Recipe-a-Day on May 22, 1998

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Raw baby back ribs. photo by sgrishka sgrishka

Removed membrane from back side of ribs. Use a paper towel to grasp the membrane and peel away from ribs. photo by sgrishka sgrishka

Sprinkle dry rub onto both sides of prepared ribs. photo by sgrishka sgrishka

Coals are ready when completely ashed over. photo by sgrishka sgrishka

Hickory wood chips, soaked in apple cider for an hour, ready to for the grill. photo by sgrishka sgrishka

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Calories Per Serving: 1476 Get detailed nutrition information, including line-by-line nutrition insights?  Try BigOven Pro for Free for 14 days!

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I'm no authority on Kansas City but these were really great ribs. The dry rub was good, so I have to disagree with its previous negative review. I believe this dry rub is based on 'Paul Kirk’s Dry Rub' recipe and actually uses less salt since his recipe also contains 1/4 cup seasoned salt. As written, this recipe calls for 1/4 cup each of Garlic Salt, Celery Salt and Onion Salt. The ratio of salt to dried seasoning in both celery salt and onion salt is approximately 3:1, the ratio salt to dried seasoning in the garlic salt is approximately 2:1. Using the math, this equates to 1/2 cup of salt content in these three seasoning (or, 1/2 cup salt in 3 cups of dry rub). Figuring about 1/4 to 1/3 cup of dry rub for each rack of ribs, this equates to about 2 to 2 1/2 teaspoons salt (aginst 4 to 5 1/2 teaspoons sugar) per rack of ribs. The composition of a dry rub is a matter of personal taste but should consist of a balance of sugar and salt, with paprika added for color, chili powder and a touch of mustard for flavor. After that it's up to you. You can add almost any spice for any degree of extra taste experiences. I usually use a simpler, basic rub, but the combination of spices in this KC-style rub was quite good. The slow-cooked and smoked ribs were tender and succulent with great flavor being imparted by both the rub and smoke. While delicious on their own, dipping or slathering the ribs with a good Kansas City style red sauce (with its multiple layers of flavors, sweets, and heats), simply pushed them over the top! Side note: If you want to reduce the amount of salt in this rub...DO NOT simply replace Garlic Salt, Celery Salt and Onion Salt with equal amounts of garlic powder, celery powder and onion powder! Doing so will result in overpowering garlic, celery and onion flavors. To reduce the amount of salt in the rub and retain the same flavor (spice) balance, you need to use the ratio stated above to calculate the amount of garlic powder, celery powder and onion powder to use. In other words, if you eliminate the 1/4 cup each of Garlic Salt, Celery Salt and Onion Salt, you should replace them with 2 tablespoons garlic powder and 1 tablespoon each of celery powder and onion powder along with the amount and type of salt that suites your taste, if desired.
sgrishka 4 years ago
Too salty, you need to cut down on the garilic, celery and onion salt by using regular powder without the salt.
grillmasterII 5 years ago
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